Assyrian reliefs from the palace of Ashurnasirpal II a cultural biography by

Cover of: Assyrian reliefs from the palace of Ashurnasirpal II |

Published by Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College, University Press of New England in Hanover, N.H .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Ashurnasirpal -- II, -- King of Assyria, -- fl. 885-860 B.C. -- Homes and haunts -- Iraq -- Calah (Extinct city),
  • Relief (Sculpture), Assyro-Babylonian -- Iraq -- Calah (Extinct city),
  • Excavations (Archaeology) -- Iraq -- Calah (Extinct city),
  • Assyria -- Antiquities

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Book details

Statementedited by Ada Cohen and Steven E. Kangas.
ContributionsCohen, Ada., Kangas, Steven E.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsNB80 .A699 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23576060M
ISBN 109781584658177
LC Control Number2009026047
OCLC/WorldCa416718797

Download Assyrian reliefs from the palace of Ashurnasirpal II

The book takes the reader from the ancient world of Assyria to its modern rediscovery to the digital reconstruction of the Nimrud palace. Lavishly illustrated with over color and 35 black-and-white images, Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II will engage and inform the student, the scholar, as well as the museum visitor.1/5(2).

The book takes the reader from the ancient world of Assyria to its modern rediscovery to the digital reconstruction of the Nimrud palace. Lavishly illustrated with over color and 35 black-and-white images, Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II will engage and inform the student, the scholar, as well as the museum visitor.

The book takes the reader from the ancient world of Assyria to its modern rediscovery to the digital reconstruction of the Nimrud palace. Lavishly illustrated with over color and 35 black-and-white images, Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II will engage and inform the student, the scholar, as well as the museum visitor 3/5(1).

Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II: A Cultural Biography. Edited by Ada Cohen and Steven E. Kangas. Hanover, New Hampshire: Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College and University Press of New England, Pp. xviii + + 2 illustrations + 26 plates +.

Wall Reliefs: Ashurnasirpal II at the North-West Palace written by Osama S. Amin “ (Property of) the palace of Assurnasirpal (II), vice-regent of Assur, chosen of Enlil and Ninurta, beloved of Anu and Dagan, destructive weapon of the great gods, strong king, king of the universe, king of Assyria, son of Tukulti-Ninurta (II), great king, strong king, king of the universe, ”.

The Assyrian reliefs were part of a wider decorative scheme which also included wall paintings and glazed bricks. Remove Ads. Advertisement. The reliefs were first used extensively by king Ashurnasirpal II (about BCE) at Kalhu (Nimrud).Author: Trustees of The British Museum.

The book takes the reader from the ancient world of Assyria to its modern rediscovery to the digital reconstruction of the Nimrud palace. Lavishly illustrated with over color and 35 black-and-white images, Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II will engage and inform the student, the scholar, as well as the museum visitor.5/5(1).

The palace of Ashurnasirpal II at Nimrud is the first, so far as we know, in which carved stone slabs were used in addition to the usual wall paintings.

These carvings portray many of the scenes described in words in the annals. †File Size: KB. Book Review: Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II: A Cultural Biography. Eds. Cohen and S.

Kangas.Hanover, NH. The Metropolitan Museum of Art houses monumental, majestic, and important works of art from the ancient world.

In particular, a group of Assyrian sculptures from the Northwest Palace at Nimrud, which was constructed during the reign of Assurnasirpal II (– B.C.), is remarkable both for its artistic excellence and for its technical skill.

Palace of Kalhu. Ashurnasirpal II's palace was built and completed in BC in Kalhu, which is in modern-day Iraq slightly north of Baghdad. The palace walls were lined with reliefs carved in alabaster.

These reliefs bore elaborate carvings, many portraying the king surrounded by winged protective spirits, or engaged in hunting or on : Tukulti-Ninurta II. Ashurnasirpal II had decorated the walls of his North-West Palace at the heart of the Assyrian Empire, Nimrud, with approximately 2-meter high alabaster bas-reliefs, depicting various scenes, like a movie in stone.

The protagonist of the play, the title role, and the award winner, undoubtedly, was the King : Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin. This relief, from the palace of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (r. B.C.), depicts a king, probably Ashurnasirpal himself, and an attendant.

The two larger-than-life-sized figures are carved in low relief, and as with other reliefs in the palace featuring the image of the king, the carving is particularly fine and shows special attention to detail.

Monique Seefried, consulting curator of Near Eastern Art at the Michael C. Carlos Museum, describes this stone palace wall relief panel of an Assyrian winged deity from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal. Book Review of Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II: A Cultural Biography, edited by Ada Cohen and Steven E.

Kangas Reviewed by Diana Krumholz McDonald American Journal of Archaeology Vol.No. 1 (January ). "Time and eternity" in the northwest palace of Ashurnasirpal II at Nimrud / Mehmet-Ali Ataì ; Ch.

Attending the king in the Assyrian reliefs / Paul Collins ; Ch. Banquets, baubles, and bronzes: material comforts in the Neo-Assyrian palaces / Allison Karmel Thomason ; Ch.

Assyrian sculpture is the sculpture of the ancient Assyrian states, especially the Neo-Assyrian Empire of to BC, which ruled modern Iraq, Syria, and much of Iran. It forms a phase of the art of Mesopotamia, differing in particular because of its much greater use of stone and gypsum alabaster for large sculpture.

Much the best-known works are the huge lamassu guarding entrance ways, and. The book takes the reader from the ancient world of Assyria to its modern rediscovery to the digital reconstruction of the Nimrud palace.

Lavishly illustrated with over color and 35 black-and-white images, Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II will engage and inform the student, the scholar, and the art lover." --Book Jacket.

Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II: A Cultural Biography by Ada Cohen and Steven E. Kangas Overview - The well-known narrative images of the Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II ( B.C.E.) at war and at the hunt are discussed frequently in studies of ancient Near Eastern art.

Ashurnasirpal II is known for his ruthless military conquests and the consolidation of the Assyrian Empire, but he is probably most famous for his grand palace at Kalhu (also known as Caleh and Nimrud in modern-day Iraq), whose wall reliefs depicting his military successes (and many victims) are on display in museums around the world in the.

The grand palace of Assurnasirpal (Ashurnasirpal) II was one of the most incredible sites of ancient Assyria. Located in Nimrud, Iraq, the immense palace was richly decorated with sophisticated alabaster reliefs.

It was a true power : Natalia Klimczak. Ashurnasirpal II. b.c.e. King of Assyria. Sources. Empire Builder. Ashurnasirpal II, son of Tukulti-Ninurta II (– b.c.e.), was the founder of a revitalized and expanded Neo-Assyrian Empire. He was renowned for his military might, conquests of foreign lands, hunting, and building activities—all aspects of the ideal Assyrian king.

Two alabaster bas-reliefs from the North-West Palace of the Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal II at Nimrud. The panels show two standing Apkallus (human-headed and winged protective spirits), one holds a goat (right) and the other holds a deer (left).

The figures face the door’s entrance. Figure 2. Digital re-colourations of a relief from the north-west palace of Ashurnasirpal II, depicting a winged genie facing an attendant carrying the king’s bow; all re-colourations are ranked in order of reliability: from one (based solely on colours found on the specified relief features) to four (integrating colours evidenced by later colour schemes on reliefs and wall paintings); the.

The Standard Inscription of Ashurnasirpal II ( B.C.) 5. The Assyrian Phenomenon: an Introductory Essay, by Susanna Hare 9. The Palace and Reliefs of Ashurnasirpal II, by Edith Porada References Plates For the sculptures illustrated in this book the Museum is indebted to the generosity of J.

Morgan and John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Ada Cohen and Steven E. Kangas, eds. Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II: A Cultural Biography Hanover, NH and Lebanon, NH: Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College and University Press of New England, pp.; color ills.; 18 b/w ills.

Paper $ (). Details of the reliefs from the palace of Neo-Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II ( BC) on view at the Metropolitan Museum of 6, × 4,; MB Details of the reliefs from the palace of Neo-Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II ( BC) on view at the Metropolitan Museum of 6, × 4,; MB.

Around 60 other museums around the world contain reliefs from Ashurnasirpal’s palace, including the British Museum, the Brooklyn Museum and the Yale University Art Gallery. ASHURNASIRPAL II ash ur nā sir pal (Akkad.Aššur-naṩir-apli, “Ashur has guarded the heir,” not named in OT).(King of Assyria b.c., son of Tukulti-Ninurta I and father of Shalmaneser III.

Although he continued to raid the tribes to the N (Mushki) and E of Assyria to keep the trade routes open, Ashurnasirpal’s main aim was the revival of Assyrian influence in the W. Ashurnasirpal II Killing Lions, from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II, Nimrud (Calah), Iraq c.

B.C. The grand palace of Assurnasirpal (Ashurnasirpal) II was one of the most incredible sites of ancient Assyria. Located in Nimrud, Iraq, the immense palace was richly decorated with sophisticated alabaster reliefs.

It was a true power center. Ashurnansirpal II was one of the great rulers of the second or Neo-Assyrian Empire. He reigned from BCE. After conquering central Anatolia, Syria, and Elam, he built an enormous palace at Nimrud, which was excavated in by Austen Henry Layard.

The walls of the palace were made mainly of mud brick, lined with sculptured stone. The reliefs in this exhibition come from the palaces of Ashurnasirpal II (– BC) and Tiglath-pileser III (– BC) at Kalhu, Sargon II (– BC) at Dur-Sharrukin, and the last great Assyrian king Ashurbanipal (– BC) at Nineveh.

The escape of enemies across a river, Stone Panel from the North-West Palace of Ashurnasirpal II, Nimrud, Neo-Assyrian, BCE 7. Lamassu (winged human-headed bull), from the citadel of Sargon II, Khorsabad, Neo-Assyrian, c.

BCE. Layard also found the colossal gateway figures and impressive bas-reliefs that adorned the walls of the Northwest Palace, and the first of the magnificent “Nimrud Ivories.” Layard mistakenly assumed that the site of Nimrud contained the remains of ancient Nineveh, the final capital of the Assyrian Empire, and in he published an account.

The Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II ( B.C.E.) established Nimrud as his capital. Many of the principal rooms and courtyards of his palace were decorated with gypsum slabs carved in relief with images of the king as high priest and as victorious hunter. AN ASSYRIAN GYPSUM RELIEF OF A WINGED GENIUS REIGN OF ASHURNASIRPAL II, CIRCA B.C.

Depicting a bearded winged deity (Apkallu) in profile to the right, wearing a triple-horned cap and a fringed cloak over a fringed and tasseled tunic and sandals, together with a pendant earring, a necklace, an armlet on his right bicep with ram-head terminals, a.

Creator: Assyrian, Nimrud, Northwest Palace of Ashurnasirpal II Physical Dimensions: 30 x 4 11/8 in. ( x cm) Rights: Museum purchase, Roscoe and Margaret Oakes Income Fund and the Walter H. and Phyllis J. Shorenstein Foundation Fund. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Assyrian Reliefs from the Palace of Ashurnasirpal II: A Cultural Biography at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our 1/5.

Some of the most spectacular depictions of the hunt were found in the palace of king Ashurnasirpal II (– BC) at the city of Nimrud (in the north of present-day Iraq).

They show the king hunting lions and wild bulls from his chariot, followed by a ritual scene where the king poured an offering of wine over the dead animals. Neo-Assyrian Kingship - Historical Narration, Royal Propaganda, and the Power of Images as Evidenced from the Relief Representations of Ashurnasirpal II's North West-Palace at Kalhu (Nimrud) Citations.

Altmetric. Author Sorace, Filomena. Date Affiliation School of Historical and Philosophical Studies. Shalmaneser III (Šulmānu-ašarēdu, "the god Shulmanu is pre-eminent") was king of Assyria (– BC), and son of the previous ruler, Ashurnasirpal II. [1] His long reign was a constant series of campaigns against the eastern tribes, the Babylonians, the nations of Mesopotamia and Syria, as well as Kizzuwadna and Urartu.

An Assyrian stone carving of a bird-headed deity from the palace of King Ashurnasirpal II ( BCE, Calah, Iraq) illustrates that animals could .

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